ACCESSORIES



Description

Tricia, the founder and artist behind this BIPOC-owned brand is a magician with thread. These bags are a personal favourite, as I love the trendy yet timeless look of them. Perfect for travel, busy marketplaces, and a hands-off vibe, these bags are so well-made, stylish and super chic. The love and care she infuses in each bag is tangible (so much better than anything mainstream or factory manufactured). With a philosophy centred around timelessness and goods that are made to last, Tree Fairfax hopes to change how we move about in the world – lighter, carrying only what we need.

How They're Sustainable

All the leather used is from 100% local sources that are traceable and native to the region (Fairfax, VA). Tricia is a one-woman team, making her bags from her living room couch, for the most authentically hand-made experience there is. She diligently hand-stitches each bag to perfection, working from a made to order plan which helps reduce waste while simultaneously ensuring that each bag is made with the utmost attention to detail and the highest quality possible.

Description

Scrunchies are back and we’re thrilled about it! Not only do they hold back hair and double as cute arm candy, they’re the nostalgic nod to the 90s that I so dig. Due to their current popularity, many are being churned out faster than ever, meaning they’re often made from unsustainable materials and questionable ethics. Redefining basics, Tradlands makes clothing that lasts, unlike fast fashion alternatives that fall apart after a few washes. Sadie, Tradlands founder, noticed that men’s clothing always seems to be made better, is longer-lasting, with fabrics and styles that are classic and simple. She wanted to create the same option, for women. Tradlands ensures durability, favourites that can be worn over and over again, and an inclusive range of sizes and options for anyone.

How They're Sustainable

These scrunchies are zero-waste, as they’re made from the fabric remnants and offcuts from their clothing line. Wearing clothing 50 times instead of 5 (the fast fashion average) reduces carbon emissions by more than 400% per item, per year. This is why quality is of the utmost importance to Tradlands – so that the clothing they make holds up and can be worn over again. Tradlands makes their clothing in small batches to avoid overproduction and wastage. Their entire design process is slow and thoughtful, with development that is properly planned out, instead of new drops every 2 weeks. They believe that a beautiful garment means nothing if human beings and the environment are exploited in the process, choosing to work with factories that have high-standards, social welfare policies in place, living wages, clean, airy environments, and never any children. This includes US-based standards of working hours, over-time payments, and never any triple shifts.

Description

My go to for scarves, this brand is owned by my mum! This beautiful brand reimagines traditional Indian textiles in a modern aesthetic, bringing to the North American market coveted natural fabrics like wool, silk, cotton and felt. The range of scarves available is vast, and each one is produced using a different method – traditional block printing, hand-painting, natural dyeing, weaving etc. From lightweight summer scarves to heavier-weight winter ones, these accessories are meant to be treasured and passed down.

How They're Sustainable

Working directly with both family and friends, every piece produced by the Winter Elephant is 100% ethical, child labour-free, and created in a clean, healthy and supportive environment. My parents visit India annually, touring the small-scale factories and working directly with their makers. I’ve visited myself and was able to witness the hand-painting technique that one maker uses, where he brush-paints the fabric on the sunlit roof of his house! Supporting this business means you’re supporting a BIPOC-owned business, contributing to the livelihood and entrepreneurial efforts of small-scale textile makers in India, and helping to revive a craft that is at risk of being thrown over for larger production facilities.  With a stress on natural fabrics, you can rest assured knowing your threads aren’t harming the oceans.


 

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